November 27, 2020 By admin

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Surface Protection/Cleaning/Maintenance

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– Since surfaces of buildings are subject to air pollution or organic growths, PCO will destroy this simply during the day, (and even in cloudy weather since even low light situations provide the minimum 20 microwatts of UV light),  and quite effectively. See the Barrandov roadway sound barrier walls. (It is a patchwork of coated and not-coated, but all the brighter and cleaner surfaces are with FN). (add image)

– Self-cleaning, the act of the degradation of dirt, oils, and other ash like residue, is one major advantage. It not only protects the wall (by removing these) it keeps the wall looking cleaner and can be consider value enhancement.

– UV light is utilized by the PCO, but it is also blocking the UV light from going through to the underlying surface. UV light is a major problem with paint chalking or chipping, along with organic growths that cause erosion. (think sunblock).

– Low maintenance: when there is less need to clean, there is less time and materials expended to clean the surfaces. This applies to interiors as well, and also to HVAC systems, since there is less filtration effort).

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Air purification

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– Interior air can be cleansed with FN when applied on walls in offices, factories, homes and hospitals/clinics.

— it destroys bacteria, allergens, and viruses. It also destroys odors. In hospitals it should reduce hospital acquired infections (we support but have not tested this theory)

— however, it does destroy viruses, more effectively than other PCOs. (I will address our virus tests later). Note that biocides and bleach are more effective for spot disinfection, but they are also more harmful in the long run and frequent use. On the wall, FN is active anytime there is light.

— as mentioned, it destroys mold that can be airborne, and is effective in structures suffering sick-building-syndrome caused by moisture and poor airflow.

(video of reduction of smoke from USA West Coast fires).